A Simple Suggestion: How Reduce the Chance of Your Resume Getting Lost in the Haystack

I get a lot of resumes by e-mail, and I find it interesting that nearly every resume file sent to me has the name “resume.”

I know to the senders it makes perfect sense. After all, it’s their resume that they created on their computer and it’s probably the only resume in their computer. It’s quite simple in their minds: “I don’t want to lose my resume, so I’ll name it ‘resume.'” Makes perfect sense . . .

Unless you’re the employer on the receiving end of dozens to hundreds to thousands of resumes. And they’re all named “resume”?!

So let’s say you’ve spoken with an employer and he or she has jotted down your name and asked you to send your resume. Of course, you sit down at your computer, write an email, attach your resume file named “resume,” and send it out immediately.

It may very well wind up in a database of files, most of which are named “resume.” Do you see where I’m going with this? If someone wants your resume, they won’t know where to begin and probably don’t have the time to look through every resume to find it.

Name your resume after yourself: last name first, period or dash, and your first name, as in “follis.anne” or “follis-anne.” If you have a common name, you might also include a middle name or initial, as in “smith.john.harrison.”

That way you have made it very easy for anyone who is looking specifically for your resume to find it. In addition to the fact that people love it when we make things easy for them, you increase your chance of standing out from the pack.

~ Anne Follis, Certified Professional Resume Writer

┬ęCopyright 2012, Anne Follis. All rights reserved.

We invite your comments and questions relating to this entry or the entire blog. However, please note that off-topic posts, as well as all spam, will be deleted.

Leave a Reply