Archive for the ‘Employment Agencies’ Category

Employment Agencies & Recruiters: An Important Consideration

Monday, September 10th, 2007

There’s a saying in the employment industry: Agencies and recruiters do not find jobs for people, they find people for jobs. In other words, with very few exceptions, they don’t work for you, they work for the employer. Since people in this business are normally paid on a commission basis, it is a volume industry that usually has a rapid turnover of clients.

Since your chances of finding a job through an agency or a recruiter are remote (the best estimates are only 10%), don’t invest a disproportionate amount of your time and resources in this area. If you learn of a job that interests you though an agency, or if you hear of a recruiter who may have some good leads, by all means look into it, but keep the main focus of your job search on networking your contacts and calling / following-up with prospective employers. These techniques are far more likely to provide success in your job search.

~ Anne Follis, CPRW

© Copyright 2010, Anne Follis. All rights reserved.

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Job Service: State Employment Offices

Monday, September 10th, 2007

About 2,000 local state employment offices, sometimes called “Job Service,” exist throughout the U.S. These offices are part of a nationwide federal network called The United States Employment Service (USES). Most of them provide assisstance to workers at a variety of levels — blue collar, clerical, management — and they have access to job listings. Some people have found these services to be of help. They’re worth checking out, although their success rate has been estimated at only about 10 to 15 percent.

~ Anne Follis, CPRW

© Copyright 2010, Anne Follis. All rights reserved.

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Employment Agencies: Full Time

Monday, September 10th, 2007

Private agencies that place people for permanent positions charge a fee, often a percentage of the first year’s salary. Sometimes the fee is paid by the employer, sometimes by the employee, and sometimes it’s divided between the two.

People looking for jobs normally contact these agencies in response to an advertisement, and some companies regularly use certain agencies. The agencies screen prospective employees, perform reference checks, and generally save companies a great deal of time and money, while only about five percent or less of the people who walk into employment agencies hoping to find a job ever do. Clearly this is a service of significant benefit to the employer, even though you may be the one who foots the bill. So before you go for an interview, understand the fee arrangement. If the fee is not paid by the employer, make sure you’re willing and able to pay it in full if you accept an offer.

To help you determine if you are working with a stable and reputable employment agency, ask how long it has been in business, not just as a nationwide chain, which some are, but how long it has been in your area. Franchise offices may be of particular benefit if you’re looking to relocate. Ask your employment counselor how long he or she has been with the company and how long he or she has been an employment counselor. Since these are commission jobs, there can be a great deal of turnover. One of my clients had an experience in which he went to an agency, filled out the forms, took the tests, submitted to a screening interview, and called back a week later, only to find out the counselor who had interviewed him had left, and no one there could find the client’s records.

Of course, there are a number of highly reputable agencies, as well as competent and caring professionals in the field. Indications of stability include the CPC designation (Certified Personnel Consultant), and membership in the National Association of Personnel Consultants.

~ Anne Follis, CPRW

© Copyright 2010, Anne Follis. All rights reserved.

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Temp Agencies

Monday, September 10th, 2007

In the past, temporary agencies placed primarily clerical and blue-collar workers, but that’s no longer the case. Companies have become increasingly cost conscious in recent years, and more reticent about taking on full-time workers who are unproven. Consequently, the temporary worker has become the norm in many organizations, from entry-level clerical jobs to management positions, and everything in between. Many temporary agencies even offer benefits to their employees.

The problem with a temporary agency is obvious, however: a lack of job security. Nevertheless, if you’ve been looking for a while with no success, you might want to consider this option. Temporary assignments allow you to fill in gaps in your resume, provide you with valuable expereince, and enable you to make new contacts. It’s even possible that a temporary job will lead to something permanent.

© Copyright 2010, Anne Follis. All rights reserved.

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